Course Syllabus

Advanced Topics & AP Biology Syllabus

 

Course Design: This course is for students desiring a first year college-level biology course.  AP Biology is taken in high school as a second year course. AP biology meets every day for 90 minutes for two semesters.   

 

Objectives and Skills: 

  • To develop reasoning skills so that students can grasp science as a process rather than an accumulation of facts.
  • Use inquiry-based learning to explore essential concepts and gain understanding of scientific processes.
  • Learn to collaborate with others both in and outside of class. 
  • Realize that studying is a daily process and must never be put off until the last minute.

Science Practices: 

  • The student can use representations and models to communicate scientific phenomena and solve scientific problems.
  • The student can use mathematics appropriately.
  • The student can engage in scientific questioning to extend thinking or to guide investigations within the context of the AP course.
  • The student can plan and implement data collection strategies appropriate to a particular scientific question.
  • The student can perform data analysis and evaluation of evidence.
  • The student can work with scientific explanations and theories.
  • The student is able to connect and relate knowledge across various scales, concepts, and representations in and across domains.

AP Exam

Students are expected to take the AP exam. The exam will be on May 13th 2019.  The exam is scored on a scale of 5 to 1, five being the highest score and three is considered passing. In the days after the exam, students will be engaged in science research and projects and will make their presentations on the scheduled exam day.

 

The Laboratory Component

Laboratory assignments offer the opportunity for students to learn about problem solving, the scientific method, the techniques of research, collaborating with a group, and the use of scientific literature. You will be expected to read and study the lab and be completely prepared before the lab is to begin. Being prepared means that you may need to complete a Pre-Lab Assessment assignment and that you will bring questions with you to class that you discover while reading the lab material.  In addition, you will complete lab reports as specified. 

Topic Outline

Topic

Chapters

Approximate Dates

Biochemistry

1 – 5, 8

August 27 – September 12

Cell

6, 7, 9 – 12

September 13th – October 11th

Genetics

13 - 20

October 12th – November 20th

Evolution

22 – 28

November 26th – January 11th 2019

Ecology

52 – 56

January 23rd – February 12th

Plant Form and Function

35 - 39

February 13th – February 27th

Animal Form and Function

40, 44, 45, 48 – 51

February 28th – March 29th

Review

 

April 1st – May 10th

Research Project

 

May 14th – May 31st

AP Biology Exam Monday May 13th 2019

 

 

Course Overview

 

Advanced Placement Biology is part of a nationwide program based on the belief that many students are ready for college work while still in high school, and their abilities should be recognized, encouraged and rewarded. As a college level course, the amount of material covered as well as the complexity of the topics will be high. It is the responsibility of the student to come to class each day understanding the previous day's material. An ongoing unstated assignment, therefore, is to learn the material as it is presented. Students must be certain that they are willing to accept this challenge and be committed to keep up with the work.

 

AP Biology is structured around four Big ideas described in the Curriculum Framework, which encompass the core scientific principles, theories, and processes governing living organisms and biological systems. At least one of the Big ideas will be incorporated in every lesson throughout the course.

 

The four Big ideas are:

 

Big idea 1: The process of evolution drives the diversity and unity of life.

Big idea 2: Biological systems utilize free energy and molecular building blocks to grow, to reproduce and to maintain dynamic homeostasis.

Big idea 3: Living systems store, retrieve, transmit and respond to information essential to life processes.

Big idea 4: Biological systems interact, and these systems and their interactions possess complex properties.

 

The two main goals of AP Biology are to help students develop a conceptual framework for modern biology and to help students gain an appreciation of science as a process. The ongoing information explosion in biology makes these goals even more challenging. Students are encouraged to focus on understanding important relationships, processes, mechanisms, and potential extensions and applications of concepts. The course provides opportunities to connect scientific knowledge to major social issues to help students become scientifically literate citizens. [ CR 5 ]

 

Hands-on labs will constitute at least 25% of instructional time [ CR 7 ].   Students will have the opportunity to complete at least two lab experiences in each of the four big ideas.  [CR 6 ] Many of these labs are inquiry based, and emphasize collaboration, development of hypotheses, data collection, analysis and presentation.  Students will maintain a laboratory notebook that documents their investigations throughout the year.

 

TEXTBOOK AND OTHER RESOURCES

Campbell Biology (9th Edition) –, October 7, 2010

by Jane B. Reece (Author), Lisa A. Urry (Author), Michael L. Cain (Author), Steven A. Wasserman

AP Biology Investigative Labs: An Inquiry-Based Approach, The College Board, 2012

Classroom website: https://sites.google.com/a/ucps.k12.nc.us/ap-biology-class/

 

Grade Distribution:

 

Tests

50%

Labs

20%

Quizzes

15%

Homework

15%

 

COURSE SCHEDULE

 

Unit 1:  The Nature of Science and the Chemistry of Life  [ CR 2 ]    ~ 2 weeks

Readings:  Chapter 1 – 5, 8

Big Ideas and Enduring Understandings to be addressed  2.A, 3A; 4A, 4B

Big Idea 1 is tied to Big Idea 4 in this introductory unit, the complexity of life, properties of living organisms and how evolution is the unifying theory of biology

Overview of Lecture and Discussion Topics:

  • Scientific method and experimental design
  • Explain what is meant by scientific theory
  • Practice with data collection, analysis, and presentation
  • Address problems in research, such as confirmation bias
  • Emphasis on evidence collecting, why evolution is considered a unifying theory

Chemistry of Life 

  • Identify basic elements of living organisms
  • Distinguish between inorganic and organic compounds
  • Describe water’s unique properties
  • Describe the structure of organic compounds
  • Understand the pH scale, redox reactions, and hydrolysis/condensation
  • Apply the laws of thermodynamics to biological systems
  • Explain how life maintains a high degree of organization
    Investigate enzyme structure and function

Unit 1 Activities

  1. Design and conduct an experiment, create and revise hypotheses, organize data, present findings {SP}
  2. Lead class discussion on experimental design by explaining the design process and identifying controls and variables {SP}
  3. Conduct an experiment to determine changes in water potential [ CR4d]
  4. Participate in asynchronous discussion where students submit a recent news article for discussion on techniques used, and implications for science and society [ CR 5 ]

 

Unit 2:  Cellular Processes [CR2] ~ 3 weeks

Readings: Chapter 6, 7, 9- 11

Enduring understandings to be addressed: 1B-D; 2A,2B; 4A

Big Ideas:   Big Idea 2 is addressed in this unit and tied to Big Idea 1 with regard to the diversity of life

Big Idea 2 is also tied to big idea 4 in showing how complex processes maintain homeostasis

 

Overview of Lecture and Discussion Topics:

  1. Review basic cellular components, construct models comparing differences between prokaryote, eukaryote, animal, and plant cells
  2. Explain the concept of selectively permeable as it applies to the cell membrane, distinguish between active and passive transport
  3. Define homeostasis and illustrate how transport is used to maintain an internal environment
  4. Understand the process by which the cell theory was developed
  5. Understand the Endosymbiosis theory and its connection to evolution [CR3A] and [CR3B]
  6. Understand the role of photosynthesis and cellular respiration in maintaining homeostasis

Unit 2 Activities

  1. Diffusion and Osmosis Lab [CR6]
  2. Microscopy Lab and Comparing Plant and Animal Cells [CR 6]
  3. Cellular Respiration Lab [CR 6] - Also connects Big Idea 2 to Big Idea 4 [CR3B] and [CR3D]
  4. Photosynthesis Lab [CR 6]
  5. Discussion of the Endosymbiosis Theory [CR3B] & [CR4B]

 

Unit 3:  Inheritance & Molecular Genetics [CR 2] ~ 5 -6 weeks

Readings:  Chapters 12 - 20

Big Ideas:  1, 2, 3, 4                                      

Enduring Understandings

  1. A Change in the genetic makeup of a population over time is evolution
  2. C Organisms use feedback mechanisms to regulate growth and reproduction, and to maintain dynamic homeostasis.
  3. E Many biological processes involved in growth, reproduction and dynamic homeostasis include temporal regulation and coordination.
  4. A Heritable information provides for continuity of life.
  5. B Expression of genetic information involves cellular and molecular mechanisms.
  6. C the processing of genetic information is imperfect and is a source of genetic variation.
  7. A Interactions within biological systems lead to complex properties.

Overview of Lecture and Discussion Topics:

  1. Mitosis and Meiosis, and the Cell Cycle
  2. What is cancer?
  3. Mendelian genetics (Law of Segregation, Independent Assortment, Dominance)
  4. Mathematical predictions (Punnett squares) and Chi Square Analysis
  5. Chromosomal Patterns of Inheritance (sex linkage)
  6. Human Genetic Disorders
  7. DNA is the genetic material (historical experiments, DNA structure and function, DNA replication)
  8. Flow of genetic information (genetic code, role of other polymers, transcription, translation)
  9. Mutations
  10. Gene expression (operon systems in prokaryotes, eukaryotic gene expression)
  11. Restriction enzymes, plasmids, transformation
  12. DNA technology (how gel electrophoresis works and applications of this technology) [CR5]
  13. Biotechnology: stem cells, synthetic biology, genetically modified foods [CR5]

Activities

  1. Microscope observations of mitosis and meiosis [CR 6]
  2. Practice genetic problems [CR4c]
  3. Genetic Disorders Presentation [CR4c]
  4. Recombinant DNA simulation [CR4c]
  5. Bacterial Transformation [CR6]
    • Also ties Big Idea 3 to Big Idea 1 [CR3A] and [CR3C]
  6. DNA Concept Map [CR4c]
  7. DNA Modeling, showing transcription and translation [CR4c]
  8. Gel Electrophoresis [CR 6]
    Class discussions on biotechnology, student lead discussions [CR5],

* Learning Objective 3.13:  The student is able to pose questions about ethical, social, or medical issues surrounding human genetic disorders.

    

Unit 4: Evolution and Phylogeny [CR2] ~ 3 weeks

Readings: Chapters 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27

                Big ideas: 1, 3, and 4

Connected to enduring understandings:

  1. A Change in the genetic makeup of a population over time is evolution.
  2. B Organisms are linked by lines of descent from common ancestry.
  3. C Life continues to evolve within a changing environment.
  4. D The origin of living systems is explained by natural processes.
  5. A Heritable information provides for continuity of life.
  6. C The processing of genetic information is imperfect and is a source of genetic variation.

4.C Naturally occurring diversity among and between components within biological systems affects interactions with the environment

Overview of Lecture and Discussion Topics

  1. Anatomy of Bacteria
  2. Diseases caused by Viruses, Protists, and Bacteria
  3. Viral and Bacterial Evolution
  4. Vaccines & Antibiotics
  5. Social Issues in disease transmission [CR 5]
  6. How natural selection serves as a mechanism for evolution
  7. Scientific evidence supporting evolution
  8. Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium
  9. Origin of Life; Fossil Records, Concepts of speciation
  10. Current events in evolution, resistance to antibiotics, pesticides, artificial selection

Activities

  1. BLAST Lab
  2. Hardy Weinberg Lab
  3. Discussion on how evolution relates to current science and biotechnology [ CR5]     
  4. Concept map on evolution, showing the processes that lead to its establishment as a theory, using PBS videos “Darwin’s Dangerous Idea” and “What Darwin Never Knew”. [CR4a]
  5. Construct a cladogram and phylogenetic tree [CR4a]
  6. Reconstruct a fossil record to further understand geologic time and extinction [CR4a]
  7. Additional videos from HHMI – evolution of skin color, lactase tolerance and evolution of anoles in the Caribbean islands.

 

Unit 5 :  Ecology and Bioethics [CR 2] ~ 4 weeks

Readings:  Chapters 52 - 56, selected articles chosen by students

Big Ideas:  1,2,3,4

Enduring Understandings

  1. A Change in the genetic makeup of a population over time is evolution.
  2. C Life continues to evolve within a changing environment.
  3. A Growth, reproduction and maintenance of the organization of living systems require free energy and matter.
  4. C Organisms use feedback mechanisms to regulate growth, reproduction and dynamic homeostasis.
  5. D Growth and dynamic homeostasis of a biological system are influenced by changes in the system’s environment.
  6. E Many biological processes involved in growth, reproduction and dynamic homeostasis include temporal regulation and coordination.
  7. E Transmission of information results in changes within and between biological systems.
  8. A Interactions within biological systems lead to complex properties.

4.B Competition and cooperation are important aspects of biological systems.

4.C Naturally occurring diversity among and between components within biological systems affects interactions with the environment

Overview of Lecture and Discussion Topics:

  1. Populations and Communities
  2. Population growth models
  3. Biodiversity and Sustainability
  4. Biomes and Ecosystems
  5. Energy flow and chemical cycling
  6. Primary productivity

Activities

  1. Biome Project - student presents a biome, discussing its characteristics and challenges [ CR 5 ]
     -  also ties Big Idea 4 to Big idea 2, [CR3B] and [CR3D]
  2. Student lead discussions on environmental topics , student share relevant articles and lead class discussions [CR5]
  3. Meet the Trees - students collect information about trees, post to Project Noah [ CR5 ]
  4. Dissolved Oxygen and Primary Productivity Lab [ CR 6 ]
  5. Human Demography Study calculating birth and death rates [ CR4d]
  6. Animal Behavior Lab [ CR 6 ]

Learning Objective 4.19  The student is able to use data analysis to refine observations and measurements regarding the effect of population interactions on patterns of species distribution and abundance.

 

Unit 6:  Plant Form and Function [CR 2] ~ 2 weeks

Reading: 35 - 39

  1. B Organisms are linked by lines of descent from common ancestry.
  2. A Growth, reproduction and maintenance of the organization of living systems require free energy and matter.
  3. C Organisms use feedback mechanisms to regulate growth and reproduction, and to maintain dynamic homeostasis.
  4. D Growth and dynamic homeostasis of a biological system are influenced by changes in the system’s environment.
  5. E Many biological processes involved in growth, reproduction and dynamic homeostasis include temporal regulation and coordination.
  6. E Transmission of information results in changes within and between biological systems.
  7. A Interactions within biological systems lead to complex properties.

Overview of Lecture and Discussion Topics:

  1. Plant Structure and Growth
  2. Resource acquisition, nutrition and transport
  3. Reproduction and Domestication of Flowering Plants
  4. Plant responses to internal and external signals

Activities:

  1. Transpiration Lab
  2. Artificial Selection
  3. Growing plants in lab

 

Unit 7: Animal Form and Function [CR 2] ~ 2 weeks

Readings: Chapters 40, 43, 44.4, 45, 48 -51

Big Ideas:  1, 2, and 4                         

In this unit, comparative anatomy is strongly emphasized, and includes the dissection of a mammal, such as a rat to compare to human anatomy.  Big Idea 1 is tied to Big Idea 4 as comparative anatomy emphasizes the relationships between organisms and similarities that imply common descent.  [CR3A] and [CR3D]

  1. B Organisms are linked by lines of descent from common ancestry.
  2. A Growth, reproduction and maintenance of the organization of living systems require free energy and matter.
  3. C Organisms use feedback mechanisms to regulate growth and reproduction, and to maintain dynamic homeostasis.
  4. D Growth and dynamic homeostasis of a biological system are influenced by changes in the system’s environment.
  5. E Many biological processes involved in growth, reproduction and dynamic homeostasis include temporal regulation and coordination.
  6. E Transmission of information results in changes within and between biological systems.
  7. A Interactions within biological systems lead to complex properties.

Overview of Lecture and Discussion Topics

  1. Feedback control loops in animals
  2. Thermoregulation & Osmoregulation in animals
  3. Energy allocation and use in animals
  4. Examples of functioning units in mammal systems (alveoli in lungs, nephrons in kidneys)
  5. Structure and function in body systems (nervous)
    Comparative anatomy (mammals, amphibians, humans)
  6. Advances in medicine [CR4C] & [CR5]

Activities

  1. Exploring the Nervous System[CR 6]
  2. Exploration of the Immune System – Study of Vaccines [CR4d]
  3. Review Cellular Respiration Lab [CR4a]
  4. Comparing rat, horse and human skeletons
  5. Animal Behavior Lab with Pill bugs [CR 6]

 

Laboratory Experiences and Scientific Practices: The 13 laboratory investigations support the AP Biology course. These laboratory investigations help students gain enduring understandings of biological concepts and the scientific evidence that supports them.

 

Science Practices Matrix for Major Labs

 

 

SP 1

Use representations and models

SP 2

 

Use mathematics

SP 3

 

Engage in scientific questioning

SP 4

 

Plan and implement data collection strategies

SP 5

 

Perform data analysis and evaluation of evidence

SP 6

 

Work with scientific explanations / theories

SP 7

 

Connect and relate knowledge

Investigation 1: Artificial Selection

 

X

X

X

X

X

X

Investigation 2: Mathematical Modeling: Hardy-Weinberg

 

 

X

X

X

X

X

BLAST Lab: Comparing DNA sequences to understand evolutionary relationships

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Osmosis and Diffusion

 

X

X

X

X

X

X

Photosynthesis

 

X

X

X

X

X

X

Cellular Respiration

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Cell Division: Mitosis & Meiosis

X

X

X

 

 

 

X

Transformation Lab

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Biotechnology: Gel Electrophoresis

X

 

X

X

X

X

X

Energy Dynamics

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Transpiration

X

X

X

 

X

X

X

Animal Behavior

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Enzyme Activity

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

 

Course Summary:

Date Details